From Germany to the world: getting the most out of internationalization

0
201

“¡Hola, amore!” This blend of Spanish and Italian between students in the corridor is not at all out of the ordinary at the Faculty of Health Sciences. Even when it’s Spanish and Italian spoken with a German accent. Rose had never been to Spain before she came to CEU UCH, but she had felt a connection with Spanish culture from the first time she came into contact with the Spanish language at nursery school in Germany.

“I wanted to improve my language skills. The culture really appeals to me and the experience has been exactly as I imagined it.” And how had she imagined it? “I expected to find friendly and warm people and you notice that friendliness even in the small things. The way people talk to you back home is different, but I feel 100% comfortable here,” she says.

A lover of dance and possessing a bubbly personality, the way she recounts her experience is fairly typical of international students on the Bachelor’s Degree in Medicine, one of the most international of all our programs. And this can also be seen in the way she talks about the wellbeing of other people, demonstrating that her first and most important consideration is always the same: other people.

“I’m fascinated by the complexity of the human body, the way it works, its ability to recover – it’s never-ending. All the health sciences appeal to me. The calling I feel came to me late and, in fact, I’ve also studied nursing, but I hope in my future career to be really useful on the individual level and also when working as part of a team, which is what I most enjoy,” she told us.

“I’m still meeting new people. It’s something that still surprises me!”

She started her degree just three months ago, but her first day in lectures still feels like it was yesterday: “I just couldn’t believe it when I sat down and I had an Italian girl to my right, an American to my left and someone from Denmark on the other side. I’m still surprised by how international life is at the Faculty.”

Who are her best friends at the moment? “Two Norwegian girls. We’re inseparable – I can’t tell you how much I’ve learnt from them.”

Rose is well aware that medical technology is advancing and changing medicine all the time, and so she feels that it’s too early to think about what she wants to specialize in, although she does admit to an attraction to genetics and oncology. “The best thing about the facilities we have is that you know that we’ll be ready for whatever the future brings,” Rose said.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Resolver: * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.